Teams exist in two layers. At the center is your core team. It includes people you closely work with on a daily basis. Next is your surrounding organizational team, guided by the overall company culture. While the organizational team sets the tone for all teams, both are crucial to personal development and overall team success. As a Definitive Logic credo principle, being a team player is quite possibly one of the most important principles as it impacts all other aspects of achievement. That’s why, here at Definitive Logic, we center around teams so we can reach our full potential and recognize the unique strengths that each one of us brings to the table.

The thought of being a team player in a remote work environment might seem like an oxymoron. However, having a support system that supports, respects, and backs one another can make all the difference in the day-to-day, especially in an isolated environment. Unfortunately, the level of support is inherently different in a remote environment compared to an on-site environment. Meaning people must take ownership of the credo principles to magnify their value, take care of their team, support one another, and keep the ship moving forward.

Being a team player encompasses a variety of qualities, but most importantly, it’s about supporting your project teams in all their successes and failures:

• Celebrating success
• Facing adversity
• Reveling in diversity
• Generating ideas
• Asking the hard questions
• Resolving problems

Being a team player sets the standard for how teams (1) work and operate together and (2) how they coexist with other teams. Additionally, being a team player is a sign of leadership. After all, the first act of leadership is to lead by example. Being a team player motivates other people to do better and be better. Team players who advance to leadership roles are sure to encourage comradeship throughout their future of leading.

Operating remotely, teleworking, creates additional needs for team players. Being the ‘support system’ that respects, and backs one another can make all the difference in the day-to-day, especially in an isolated environment. Take ownership of the credo principles to magnify the value of others. Take care of your team. Support one another, and keep the ship moving forward. Being a team player encompasses a variety of qualities, but most importantly, it’s about supporting your project teams in all their successes and failures.

Sometimes people can get envious watching others succeed. However, being a team player means celebrating the achievements of others and truly believing in your team. As others follow the steppingstones to success, it’s important that their team be right there behind them, cheering them on. The true testament to a good team is when your foundation stays strong throughout any change management.

So, what does being a team player boil down to?

• Stepping up. Take responsibility by stepping up when things go wrong and focus on protecting the house.

• Stepping in. Use situational awareness to identify opportunities for growth and fill the gaps. Sometimes you need to step in to take project pressure off of your peers and keep the team functioning smoothly.

• Stepping out. Know when to be a leader and when to be a follower. A good team player knows when to step out of a situation to allow their teammate to take ownership. Know when it’s time to celebrate the achievements of one another and allow them their moment to revel in their success. Ultimately, allow freedom and give credit where credit is due.

• Stepping together. Support, respect, and back your team through successes and failures and be a good person while doing it. Recognize what each person brings to the table and encourage them to reach their full potential.

Whether you step up when things go wrong, protect the house, or be a good person, being a team player is at the core of everything. Looking at DL’s credo principles with a team mindset makes it that much easier to visualize the path laid out before you and your team. Following DL’s credo principle of being a team player sets teams up to work through hardships and come out stronger.

Written by:
Robert Briggs
Robert is a Software Developer at Definitive Logic. Like many software developers, Robert works in project teams on a daily basis.

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